Truisms and Inflammatory Essays by Jenny Holzer. American

This is a sampling of Holzer’s early work, where she printed out the above and plastered them all over NYC in the late 1980’s and early 1990’s. Unlike her current work, these were never intended to be museum pieces, but displayed in the public sphere. Also they were not produced to become permanent pieces of art. 

(via ill-use)


The proper response to street harassment

The proper response to street harassment

(via sluteverxxx)

art-yeti:

Issey Miyake,  Extreme Film

ecstatic-hysteria baaabbeeee

sarahjeanalex:

1.
why isn’t every picture that exists of you with someone else
a picture of you with me instead

all of these people are so many people
and none of these people are me

 

2.
i am sitting in a corner eleven stories high and
i am a very long time away from you

 

3.
you are drinking my blood in a non-literal way
we laugh but make extremely worried faces
i am being myopic because there is only
one screen in front of me and one screen in front of you
and we are practically touching in here
(feeling real is hard work / moving is even harder)

 

4.
spring forward, fall back down
i’m trying not to wonder where you are

are you listening to this too

 

5.
it seems irrational that it is 2014
and i cannot just be in love with another person
who wants to be near me in the same ways
an advance in date doesn’t negate a regard for others
ok i understand but i will try to get what i want anyway
can everyone help

like hello welcome to this place
let’s both just stay

a long time ago someone told me that
it’s not cute to be persistent
(i know you don’t belong to me)
but i am so good at it
i think you will agree

 

6.
after three hours in karpeles i took a two hour walk
i made myself alone because there are too many books in the world already
and you are too good
you squeezed a sigh out of me when i returned and i felt found

 

7.
last night i dreamt someone offered me one thousand dollars to close my eyes and sit in a chair for sixty seconds and instead i moved onto the floor, kneeled and retched loudly in front of him. i stared at my hands pressed flat against the floor and lifted them up one by one. i slowly crawled out of the room.

(via blog-illuminatigirlgang)

“Women are described in animal terms as pets, cows, sows, foxes, chicks, serpents, bitches, beavers, old bats, old hens, mother hens, pussycats, cats, cheetahs, bird-brains, and hare-brains…‘Mother Nature’ is raped, mastered, conquered, mined; her secrets are ‘penetrated,’ her ‘womb’ is to be put into the service of the ‘man of science.’ Virgin timber is felled, cut down; fertile soil is tilled, and land that lies ‘fallow’ is ‘barren,’ useless. The exploitation of nature and animals is justified by feminizing them; the exploitation of women is justified by naturalizing them.”
— Karen J. Warren Ecological Feminism  (via jinx—removing)

(via featherlightheart)

I’ll never punish my daughter for saying no.

The first time it comes out of her mouth, I’ll smile gleefully. As she repeats “No! No! No!” I’ll laugh, overjoyed. At a young age, she’ll have mastered a wonderful skill. A skill I’m still trying to learn. I know I’ll have to teach her that she has to eat her vegetables, and she has to take a nap. But “No” is not wrong. It is not disobedience.

1. She will know her feelings are valid.
2. She will know that when I no longer guide her, she still has a right to refuse.

The first time a boy pulls her hair after she says no, and the teacher tells her “boys will be boys,” we will go to her together, and explain that my daughter’s body is not a public amenity. That boy isn’t teasing her because he likes her, he is harassing her because it is allowed. I will not reinforce that opinion. If my son can understand that “no means no” so can everyone else’s.

3. She owes no one her silence, her time, or her cooperation.

The first time she tells a teacher, “No, that is wrong,” and proceeds to correct his public school, biased rhetoric, I’ll revel in the fact that she knows her history; that she knows our history. The first time she tells me “No” with the purpose and authority that each adult is entitled, I will stop. I will apologize. I will listen.

4. She is entitled to her feelings and her space. I, even a a parent, have no right to violate them.
5. No one has a right to violate them.

The first time my mother questions why I won’t make her kiss my great aunt at Christmas, I’ll explain that her space isn’t mine to control. That she gains nothing but self doubt when she is forced into unwanted affection. I’ll explain that “no” is a complete sentence. When the rest of my family questions why she is not made to wear a dress to our reunion dinner. I will explain that her expression is her own. It provides no growth to force her into unnecessary and unwanted situation.

6. She is entitled to her expression.

When my daughter leaves my home, and learns that the world is not as open, caring, and supportive as her mother, she will be prepared. She will know that she can return if she wishes, that the real world can wait. She will not want to. She will not need to. I will have prepared her, as much as I can, for a world that will try to push her down at every turn.

7. She is her own person. She is complete as she is.

I will never punish my daughter for saying no. I want “No” to be a familiar friend. I never want her to feel that she cannot say it. She will know how to call on “No” whenever it is needed, or wanted.

— Lessons I Will Teach, Because the World Will Not — Y.S.  (via ceedling)

(via ceedling)

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(via madiswanelizabeth)

riders-on-the-st0rm:

Stevie Nicks

rebarpattern:

Mona Hatoum, Kapan, 2012

(via ill-use)

nadimnida:

"The Last Billboard" 

A 36-foot-long billboard located at the corner of Highland and Baum in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Every month, a different individual is invited to take over the billboard to broadcast personalized messages, which are spelt out using wooden letters that are changed by hand.

(via skyl0rd)

ghostphotographs:

HAPPY FRIDAY Y’ALL xo